Call for Papers

The Philosophy of Ian Hacking

Institute of Philosophy, Research Centre for the Humanities, Hungarian Academy of Sciences

Dates: 29th and 30th of March, 2019.

Organizer: The MTA BTK Lendület Morals and Science Research Group

Ian Hacking’s thought has contributed highly original insights to the philosophical landscape of the late 20th and early 21st century. His interests in the history and philosophy of mathematics and the natural sciences in general (The Logic of Statistical Inference, Representing and Intervening, Why is There Philosophy of Mathematics at All?); in the concept of probability in particular (The Emergence of Probability, The Taming of Chance); and in the metaphysical and social scientific implications of human (or interactive) kinds (Rewriting the Soul, Mad Travelers, The Social Construction of What?) all provide significant additions to the canon of analytic philosophy.

This conference aims to engage all aspects of Ian Hacking’s philosophy, bringing together scholars working in the fields touched upon by Hacking’s body of work in the philosophy of logic, the history and philosophy of science, the philosophy of language and the philosophy of the social sciences. Contributions from all areas of philosophy and scientific thought are welcome, aiming to address the questions including, but not limited to the following:

General assessments:

-          How does Hacking’s philosophy relate to its influences in both the analytic and the continental traditions? How did it influence philosophy in the 21st century?

-          What connections are there between the main areas of interest in Hacking’s philosophical body of work?

Specific topics:

-          What role does the concept of probability play in scientific reasoning, and how did the concept emerge to fulfill that role?

-          What is the relation of language to philosophical thought in the early 21st century?

-          How does experimentation influence theory choice (and vice versa) in scientific thinking?

-          What are the peculiar characteristics of human (or interactive) kinds contrasted with natural kinds?

Abstracts of about 500 words should be sent to Dr. Akos Sivado, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Speakers include:

Rachel Cooper (Lancaster University)
Janette Dinishak (University of California, Santa Cruz)
Axel Gelfert (Technical University of Berlin)
Mark Risjord (Emory University)
Paul A. Roth (University of California, Santa Cruz)
Luca Sciortino (University of Leeds)
Jonathan Tsou (Iowa State University)

The deadline for submissions is 1st December 2018.

The MTA BTK Lendület Morals and Science Research Group and
Hertford College, Oxford
 
will be hosting a workshop entitled
 
RECASTING THE TREATISE VOL. II.
 
This will be the second workshop of a series focusing on the contrasts and differences between David Hume’s A Treatise of Human Nature and his later philosophical works that descended from it. The first workshop was held in Budapest in March 2018, and focused on topics from Treatise Book 1, the Enquiry concerning Human Understanding, and relevant essays. The second workshop, will be held at
 
Hertford College, Oxford, on the 23rd-24th of March 2019.
 
This workshop will be devoted to Treatise Book 2, the Four Dissertations of 1757 (notably the “Dissertation on the Passions”), and relevant essays. The third workshop, provisionally planned to be held in Budapest in September 2019, will be focused on Treatise Book 3, the Enquiry on the Principles of Morals, and relevant essays.
 
Invited members include: Kate Abramson, Miren Boehm, Don Garrett, Lorenzo Greco, James Harris, Jane McIntyre, Jennifer Marusic, Amyas Merivale, Dan O’Brien, Katarina Paxman, Hsueh Qu, Jacqueline Taylor, Margaret Watkins.
 
At this stage we are inviting extended abstracts of about 1,000 words for the second workshop. The deadline for submission is 31st of December 2018.

Please send your abstracts to the organizers:
Tamás Demeter (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
 

CALL FOR PAPERS

We plan to dedicate a special issue of Organon F to modal logic. The special issue will be published in the first half of 2019 and will have the title below:

Reflecting on the legacy of C.I. Lewis: contemporary and historical perspectives on modal logic

We invite submissions presenting
– technical results in any area of modal logic, provided that they are illustrated in a detailed way and are accessible to a broad audience;

– philosophical applications (or discussing philosophical aspects) of modal logic, provided that they are connected to a relevant tradition of studies;

– historical discussions on the development of modal logic after C.I. Lewis's early works, provided that they have some relevance for contemporary investigations.

The special issue will be guest-edited by Matteo Pascucci (Vienna University of Technology and Slovak Academy of Sciences) and Ádám Tamás Tuboly (Hungarian Academy of Sciences and University of Pécs). It will include three invited articles by established researchers in the field and contributed manuscripts selected via a double-blind reviewing process. There are no restrictions regarding the style of submitted manuscripts, but the authors of accepted contributions will be asked to prepare their final versions according to the journal's guidelines. Manuscripts should be sent in pdf format by

15 September 2018

to any of the guest-editors (please, put ORGANON-F-MODAL-LOGIC-SUBMISSION as a subject):

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Feel free to contact the guest-editors for further information on the special issue and on the format of submissions.

Call for Papers The 2nd Bucharest-Budapest Workshop in Philosophy
Budapest, Institute of Philosophy, RCH, HAS
28-29 July 2018

HUMEANISMS

In various branches of philosophy, several positions are called "Humean". If someone holds that modal features supervene on the spatiotemporal distribution of fundamental non-modal properties, then (s)he is a Humean. If someone argues that our reasons for action cannot be explained in terms of our beliefs without reference to desires, then (s)he is a Humean. This workshop seeks answers to questions about various forms of Humeanisms. Although Humeanism is a well-known philosophical view, the conditions for labeling a position Humean are not always clear. One might say that Humeans are those who take themselves as modern adherents to Hume's philosophy -- but under what interpretation? Vice versa, in the light of contemporary Humeanisms, how can we answer the question whether Hume, himself, was a Humean? Can one elaborate contemporary Humeanism as a unified, all-purpose strategy for approaching philosophical problems? We are looking for papers that discuss (a) Humean strategies in metaphysics, epistemology, practical philosophy or phenomenology, and (b) theories in these areas that engage critically and constructively with Hume's own philosophy.

We invite submissions for presentations (30 min talk + 15 min Q&A). Please send a 500 word abstract to any of the email addresses below for double blind review.

Important dates:
• Deadline for submissions: March 31, 2018.
• Communication of acceptance: May 1, 2018.

Invited speakers include:
• Miren Boehm
• Marian David
• Michael Esfeld
• Kevin Mulligan
• Steff Rocknak

Organizers:
• Tamas Demeter (Budapest)
• Laszlo Kocsis (Pécs)
• Iulian Toader (Salzburg/Bucharest)

For questions, please contact us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Sixty Years of an Idea: Peter Winch's "The Idea of a Social Science" after more than Half a Century
University of Pécs, Hungary

Date: 30th-31st March 2018

Organizers:
Department of Sociology, University of Pécs, and
MTA BTK Lendület Morals and Science Research Group

Peter Winch’s The Idea of a Social Science and its Relation to Philosophy was first published in 1958 – and it is still in the forefront of controversies. Winch’s Wittgensteinian approach to sociological problems, his conception of understanding (Verstehen) and its focus on rule-following, and his vision on the relation of social science and philosophy found a peculiar place within the Verstehen-tradition and collided with alternative conceptions of understanding (most importantly, Max Weber’s verstehende Soziologie). Winch’s view of social science made him a worthy opponent of many different and well-entrenched positions in the philosophy of the social sciences – and after having been labeled the ’linguistic variant of Dilthey’, a ’collective solipsist’ and a radical relativist, in the introduction to the second edition (published in 1990) he took steps toward a slightly modified and softened position – without revising the original text.

This workshop aims to assess the afterlife of Winch’s book, to take up topics central to the text and to Winch’s oeuvre (philosophy of the social sciences, interpretive social science, social theory, ethics), and revisit them after more than half a century of their initial formulation.  We invite submissions on the legacy of Peter Winch’s thought for the philosophy of the social sciences and social scientific methodology, particularly in the context of Verstehen and interpretation.

The questions our workshop aims to address include but are not limited to the following:
-    How does the Winchian account of interpretation relate to different concepts of social scientific understanding?
-    What kind of philosophical consequences can be drawn from a Winchian view regarding the building blocks of society and social life?
-    What kind of consequences could be derived for the practice of sociology, anthropology or political science?
-    What kind of ethical considerations are worth addressing regarding society and interpretation?

Abstracts of about 500 words should be sent to Dr. Akos Sivado This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Speakers include:
Michael Campbell (University of Pardubice)
Katalin Füzér (University of Pécs)
Juliette Harkin (University of East Anglia)
Marcus Morgan (University of Bristol)
Rupert Read (University of East Anglia)
Lynette Reid (Dalhousie University)
Paul A. Roth (University of California, Santa Cruz)
Mark Theunissen (The New School for Social Research)
Leonidas Tsilipakos (University of Bristol)
Christopher Winch (King’s College, London)

The deadline for submissions is 1st December 2017.

Page 1 of 2